The Pros and Cons of Collaborative Writing

Worth a read

Crystal MM Burton

In April 2018, the Collaborative Writing Challenge released Army of Brass, their seventh collaborative novel and a fun steampunk adventure. During the launch, more and more people were talking about collaborative writing. How do you do it? Is it hard? What are the benefits? Today I’m going to talk about all of that and more, with a feature from the coordinator of the novel herself, Phoebe Darqueling.

 


What is collaborative writing?

Collaborative writing is a single story crafted by more than one writer. Even just two people working together constitute a collaborative effort. The methods they choose to use may differ, but the result is the same: a coherent novel.

In some situations, multiple minds are put together in the creation while only one or two people do the actual writing itself. Often times, many writers will take turns writing a continuous plot line using the same characters…

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How long should a chapter be?

I've blogged about this before but I'm in a quandary again so I think it's worth a revisit. I'm massively editing Chapter One (currently called Wigginton, Tamworth, England - 1883). There are three distinct scenes in it. To keep them together, will have a chapter of between 6500 and 7000 words. But to separate them... Continue Reading →

Bring on 2019

Yep. We've all done it. Made New Year's resolutions, only to break them. This year, however, I'm determined not to do that. Here's the thing: I really want to get more regular with my blog (one of last year's resolutions that I broke) AND I want to get my novel to a point where it... Continue Reading →

History and fiction

An interesting read: what do you think?

Kelly Gardiner

Here’s the text of a speech I gave at a History Council of Victoria seminar on History and Fiction, 28 August 2018.

Other speakers were Linda Weste and Ali Alizadeh, and the panel was chaired by Kathleen Neal.

Here’s (roughly) what I said.

What is historical fiction? You may have an idea in your head – a shelf of maritime novels by Patrick O’Brien, or blockbusters glimpsed in airport bookshops – all armour and abs and authors names in gold lettering. In truth, it’s a broad church. The definition of the Historical Novel Society is simply that it is fiction set more than 50 years ago, or beyond the personal experience of the author. It includes incredibly popular genres such as historical crime and romance, sub-genres such as military or adventure tales, cosy mysteries and thrillers, literary or experimental fiction set in the past, entire industries of Regency and…

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Third Person POV – what a minefield

According to Your Dictionary, "[w]riting in third person is writing from the third-person point of view, or outsider looking in, and uses pronouns like he, she, it, or they. It differs from the first person, which uses pronouns such as I and me, and from the second person, which uses pronouns such as you and... Continue Reading →

The Wives and Family of King Harold II

And stealing some more good stuff to share

History... the interesting bits!

Statue of King Harold II at Waltham Abbey

The future king, Harold II Godwinson, was born into an Anglo-Danish family whose extensive influence and power meant they were frequently seen as the power behind the throne. This also meant that they were often seen as a threat to the man wearing the crown – especially Edward the Confessor – and suffered exile as a result.

Harold was born around 1022/3 to Godwin and his wife, Gytha Thorkelsdottir. Gytha was a member of the extended Danish royal family, as her brother, Ulf, was married to King Cnut the Great’s sister, Estrith. Gytha’s nephew, Sweyn Estrithson, would eventually rule Denmark as king. Harold received the earldom of East Anglia in 1044 and, as the oldest surviving son of Godwin, Earl of Wessex, he succeeded to his father’s earldom in 1053. Godwin died at Winchester in Easter week of 1053, after collapsing during…

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Chapter 12: The Battle 4) Harold meets his end and William wins by the skin of his teeth.

I’m pinching stuff again. This is an interesting read

The Road to Hastings and other Stories

In the previous post, the battle had reached a turning point, one that had finally made a dent in the English Shield Wall. We saw previously, how the Normans had been fighting hard to crack the hard nut that was the English defence. No matter how hard the infantry and cavalry fought, they just couldn’t break in. Even the Norman archers had not made much of an impact. The terrain was not conducive for archers to shoot up hill on such an incline, many of their arrows fell short or went over their enemy’s heads. And it depended on which way the wind was blowing, too, for the wind in their faces would have hampered their shots. The archers were lightly armoured, and most likely would not have wanted to come too close to the fierce, snarling men of the shield wall with their huge Dane axes that could cleave…

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