7 Awesome Writing Prompt Resources! #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

What great tips! No excuses for writer’s block now.

The Dragonspire

Welcome to the last Author Toolbox post of 2019!

Previously I’ve written about writer’s block, and how free-writing to random prompts can help break it. But where do you find these mysterious prompts? This month I’ll share my favourite writing prompt resources. For anyone doing Nanowrimo, they may help if you get stuck!

7 awesome writing prompt resources: Author toolbox blog hop

1) Random Word Generators:

Does what it says on the tin. There are websites, like Random Word.com, which provide a random new word with each refresh.

Example word, Random Word Generator: Illuminism Like ‘illuminism’: belief in an inward spiritual light!

There’s a definition below the word too: Not only is it a great way to get writing prompts, it also helps you learn new words!

2) Story Cubes:

Story cubes are great fun. Each dice has 6 pictures on it, and there are 9 dice in a set. Roll all 9, and pick 3 dice for the beginning of your story, 3…

View original post 657 more words

Take Care of YOU Simple Habits for the Writer, Creative, Everyone! #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

It is vital to look after yourself if you are to be useful and productive. Some tips from author Carmen Suarez

Creative Simplicity

*Below is not a transcript of video.

A few years ago, I had to go to the doctor’s office because I was experiencing so much wrist pain I had to get it checked out. At that time, I learned everything I needed to know about carpal tunnel syndrome and because it sidelined me for quite a while, I decided to start making some changes quickly to avoid ever going down that road again. I developed some really easy habits that I do every day that I wanted to share with everyone who writes, stares at a computer all day or is on the phone regularly.

A lot of writers, and creative people in general, tend to
overwork themselves especially when they’re in that zone or experiencing that
ever elusive “light bulb” moment. We’ll write
for hours without stopping — we’re also prone to over-due it when we’re
experiencing some sort…

View original post 514 more words

Pitch (More like a Friendship) Wars

An approach to Pitch Wars from author Rebecca Chaney

Rebecca Chaney

Hi all,

So this week, after much umm’ing and ah’ing, I decided to submit my middle grade manuscript to Pitch Wars.

For those unaware, Pitch Wars is a mentoring program where mentors select a writer and work with them over a three month period, offering suggestions to improve their manuscript, query letter, and pitch for a subsequent agent showcase event. More details of the program can be found here.

I’ll be honest, I was undecided about entering this program for the reason most writers hesitate: lack of belief that my writing is good enough. But that is also why I DID want to enter. What I do believe in is my story’s (and my writing’s) potential. I’m just not sure how to reach it. I know my story is not where I want it, but I’m not sure how to get it there.

There are two more reasons I decided…

View original post 270 more words

The Real Godiva

Lady Godiva – always interesting

The Road to Hastings and other Stories

While researching Silk and the Sword: the Women of the Norman Conquest I came across some incredibly interesting characters. One of the most misunderstood women of the 11th century has to be Lady Godiva. Although she would have been known as Godgifu in her lifetime, we shall call her Godiva, the name we have all grown up with, and to distinguish her from several notable ladies of a similar name in this period. Known for her legendary naked ride through Coventry in order to ease the tax burdens of its citizens, finding the true story of Lady Godiva was a fascinating experience. She was the grandmother of three of the leading English characters of the Norman Conquest; Harold II’s queen, Ealdgyth and the earls of Mercia and Northumberland, Edwin and Morcar.

The origins of Lady Godiva herself, are shrouded in mystery and the distance of time. We know nothing of…

View original post 2,707 more words

How to de-emphasize characters #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

Some excellent advice here from crime writer Raimey Gallant

Raimey Gallant

How to de-emphasize characters

THE FOLLOWING CONVERSATION, WHICH IS BASED ON A REAL EMAIL EXCHANGE WITH MY AGENT, HAS BEEN SET IN A 1920’S HARD-BOILED DETECTIVE NOVEL FOR DRAMATIC PURPOSES.

How to de-emphasize your characters

So I pick up the telephone and wouldn’tcha know—it’s my agent. “Too many characters in your manuscript,” she says to me.

So I says to my agent, I says, “Well, golly. What do I do?”

“Kill two of ’em. Kill two of ’em dead.”

Course, I know my agent isn’t suggesting I put a hit out on my characters, but—ha!—wouldn’t it be a laugh if she was. “Suppose we edit out this one dame,” I says to her (I didn’t much like that character anyway), “but instead of killing this other fella, suppose we de-emphasize him. I can cut back his description, and hey, I can un-name him, too. That way, the amount of words devoted to him is more proportional-like, as far as…

View original post 552 more words

Lest we forget

  The Wall of Remembrance at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, Australia, holds the names of over 100,000 Australian servicemen and women who lost their lives fighting in a war. Some were volunteers, some were conscripts - but all of them deserve to be remembered with honour and respect. I won't go into details... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑